Pozz Overview

Pozz Overview

The Pozz Project Overview

The Company’s Pozz Project is an initiative to search for and acquire, at low-cost, deposits having potential for the production of natural pozzolan. Currently the Company holds two separate projects within this “umbrella” initiative.

The lead project is the CS Pozzolan-Perlite Deposit and has overtaken the Company’s original Pozz Ash Deposit where testwork was less favourable.

The production of cement is responsible for 5% of the global man-made carbon dioxide emissions with nearly one tonne of CO2 generated for each tonne of cement produced. Cement manufacturers are therefore under strong pressure to minimise their carbon footprint and the use of pozzolan as a partial replacement for Portland cement in cement and concrete mixes is one way in which this is being achieved.

Pozzolan is defined (ASTM C125) as a siliceous or siliceous and aluminous material, which in itself possesses little or no cementitious value but will, in finely divided form and in the presence of moisture, chemically react with calcium hydroxide (lime) at ordinary temperatures to form compounds possessing cementitious properties.

The Romans perfected the use in natural pozzolan/lime mixtures over 2000 years ago and “Roman” cement was the main cement used until Portland cement became popular in the early 1900s and established as the main hydraulic cement used today.

In addition to reducing greenhouse gasses, the use of pozzolan can provide benefits in terms of long-term strength and stability in cement and concrete and mitigate the effects of alkali-silica reactions which can cause cracking in modern concrete structures. Natural pozzolans can also replace the use of industrial by-product pozzolans in cement such as coal fly-ash. The availability and quality of fly ash is under threat as coal fired power stations are phased out and quality becomes more variable due to increased emission control legislation.

Some Roman concrete structures have survived for millennia whereas many modern concrete structures are susceptible to “concrete cancer”.

Natural pozzolans are therefore experiencing a resurgence in demand based on their strong “green” credentials. Today, pozzolans are used as a direct additive to concrete mixes and as a partial replacement for cement in amounts of up to 35% of the cementing material.

Pozzolan Outcrop

Pozzolan Outcrop

Crack in modern concrete structure due to Alkali-Silica Reaction

Crack in modern concrete structure due to Alkali-Silica Reaction

2,000 year old Pantheon Dome, Rome

2,000 year old Pantheon Dome, Rome